If you're looking to upload an image to a blog post, for example, examine the file for its file size first. If it's anywhere in megabyte (MB) territory, even just 1 MB, it's a good idea to use an image compression tool to reduce the file size before uploading it to your blog. Sites like TinyPNG make it easy to compress images in bulk, while Google's very own Squoosh has been known to shrink image file sizes to microscopic levels.
For example, we regularly create content on the topic of "SEO," but it's still very difficult to rank well on Google for such a popular topic on this acronym alone. We also risk competing with our own content by creating multiple pages that are all targeting the exact same keyword -- and potentially the same search engine results page (SERP). Therefore, we also create content on conducting keyword research, optimizing images for search engines, creating an SEO strategy (which you're reading right now), and other subtopics within SEO.
Learning the right blog SEO strategies and best practices of using target keyword phrases should be your top priority. You should learn how to do keyword research—and use those core target keywords in the headline, throughout the article, and in your image file names, there are a lot of other best practices to get familiar with, like making your URL SEO-friendly and using keyword synonyms. There’s a lot to learn.

I’ve just taken the SEO role at my agency full time and, whilst it can be difficult at times, I am liking the challenge. I wonder if you had any suggestions when it came to finding “opportunity keywords” for term/subjects that don’t necessarily have massive search volumes associated to them? I use a few tools and utilise Google’s related terms already, but wondered if there were any tricks for finding new markets?
Want to see all of the images on a Web page along with their size, alt text, and a real-size display of the image? How about a list of all of your page links: external links, internal links, style sheets, XML, and other assets? Do you know which ones aren't working? Among our free SEO tools, this one is always popular for its multipurpose functionality!

Search engine advertising (Google Adwords, Bing Ads): When you hear PPC, there’s a decent chance that it’s referring to search engine marketing. The process is similar to others, in that you bid for a specific phrase so that your website will appear in the results when they search the phrase. When they click on your ad, you pay the bid price that you set when you first created the ad.


Clearly, paying for ads and other initiatives is always one method to drive traffic to your site or blog. If you have a small budget, and you track things properly, you can come up with a cost-per acquisition (CPA). If your CPA is high enough, you can comfortably scale your advertising revenues. Be sure to implement things like Facebook and Google tracking pixels to determine the effectiveness of your ads.
How to use Charlie: Intended as a tool to help you prep for meeting new people, Charlie gives you a full run-down of a person—social media profiles, biography, interests, big news, etc.—by looking at your upcoming calendar or running an email address. If you’re wanting info on a single person ad-hoc, simply enter their email address into Charlie, and they’ll tell you everything.
An online grammar checker and proofreading tool like Grammarly can help you check and avoid several types of errors in your writing. It detects grammar, spelling and punctuation mistakes from basic to advance level in your content draft. You can use this tool to make sure your book, article or blog post is free from any prominent mistakes and easy to read.
Google Analytics comes with some of the most useful features from campaign measurement to track your site’s traffic properly, from website conversions to user activity, from audience report to know your users, from flow visualization graphics to monitor your website visitors, etc. Beyond that, you can set up custom reports, goals and monitor events to learn more about users’ engagement.

Nice work Laura! This is going to be a great series. I'm working my way through SEOmoz's Advanced SEO Training Series (videos) Vol. 1 & 2 to build upon the advice and guidance that you and your team provided to me during my time at Yahoo!. Now many others will benefit from your knowledge, experience and passion for SEO strategy and tactics. Best wishes for great success in your new role.
The whole challenge was an exercise in connecting with my community and showing that it can be simple to build the foundation of a business, no matter what that business is (they chose a hiking guide for California, by the way), but it also served to generate interest and drive traffic to my blog, to see how the heck I was going to pull that off. Plus as an added bonus, I began fielding offers for both freelance and remote jobs as a result.
Having my own podcast for the past few years, I know first-hand that podcast hosts are always looking for people with great stories in their niche to interview and highlight for their listeners. Using that knowledge, it’s not hard to deduce that other podcast hosts would be receptive to having me on as a guest that can share from my deep well of blogging advice (and growing a six-figure blog business). Being a guest on several podcasts like Tropical MBA recently, I’ve mastered this channel for how to drive traffic to your blog.

What problems do your readers have? Teach them how to solve them, and as a result of launching an online course, you’ll likely drive traffic to your blog and you could even begin to field offers for other types of work from home jobs like coaching, consulting and advising as your audience as your authority grows. Plus, this can evolve into a phenomenal way to make money blogging in a much more passive capacity as your traffic grows.
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